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Third person pronouns in your language

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by SAF, Jan 19, 2022.

  1. SAF

    SAF Team of Conflict

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    So we all know that English has quite a lot of third-person pronouns: he/him, she/her, they/them (singular or plural), it/its, and many more neopronouns coming out nowadays. It made me curious about such pronouns in other languages. Why? Because in my native language (Indonesian), there's only one third-person pronoun covering all of them: dia/-nya.

    If you speak any other languages (be it your native one or those you've been learning), how do those languages handle third-person pronouns?
     
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    #1 Jan 19, 2022
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2022
  2. Jeydis

    Jeydis Perpetually catching up on Critical Role.

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    French has a bunch but the main ones are: il/elle (equivalent of he/she), ils/elles(multiple he/shes), vous (s is silent, used to address a group of folks or someone older/higher in rank etc.), nous (silent s again, used to address a group you are part of). There are some gender neutral neopronouns but they are tricky since all of french is made into masculine and feminine
     
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  3. Skdebop

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    In spanish we have El Ella or Ellos
     
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  4. Jupjami

    Jupjami Lizardman

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    Gender-neutral gang! Tagalog uses siya/niya/kaniya, Ilocano uses isu/na/kaniana; generally Austronesian langs all use a universal third person pronoun~ Only downside to that is that from time to time we get confused with other languages that do have grammatical gender, i.e. "Where did grandpa place her glasses?" and "She looks just like his mother".

    Interestingly enough this makes neopronouns more confusing, mostly because we don't even have the need for them in the first place :p
     
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  5. LassusVulpes

    LassusVulpes you thought it'd be a title, but it was me! DIO!

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    Okay, so for ASL, we keep it similar. But there's somethings people will find different.

    Index finger to chest - Me, hand spread out Mine, Hand pushing out Yours, Index finger pointing to person, You. Two hands spread out pushing away to a group Theirs.

    Basically, you gotta watch where they move there hands the position, how it's formatted, matters. With ASL it can be tricky, cause B to your mouth, means breakfast. If you swipe it to the left, it means "Bitch" *yes i've signed it to my brother before"
    And if you're signing Coffee, You have to move both your hands in a circular motion on top of one another, If you don't move the bottom hand it means Make out.
     
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  6. Neb

    Neb Cosmog Enthusiast

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    In my second language, Japanese, third person pronouns are rarely spoken. Instead, people simply use the person’s name. In things like books or TV shows you’ll sometimes see “kare” for “his” and “kanojo” for “her.” When speaking these words mean “boyfriend” and “girlfriend,” but they’re used as third person pronouns elsewhere.
     
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